Contain Your Closet


Rejoice! The long, cold winter has finally made way for some much-needed sunshine, and it’s now time to make way in your closet for spring/summer style. As for me, I personally couldn’t be more thrilled that spring has sprung—I don’t think I’ve ever been more excited to switch out my winter clothes for my warm-weather wardrobe. This month’s newsletter is devoted to making that transition a seamless process for your seams!

Allison’s Tips for a Streamlined Spring
Love it or leave it. On the fence about whether to keep something in the fold? If you’re having trouble deciding about a piece of clothing, chances are you no longer need it. Keep only the items that you look and feel good in, not the “10 pounds from now” jeans or those ancient T-shirts. (If you’re really having trouble parting with those sentimental T’s, consider combining the best of both worlds and commissioning a T-shirt quilt.)
Don’t get out of sorts. Categorizing your closet is a simple and effective way to whip it into shape. Sort clothes by style and color for easy one-stop shopping and outfit coordination.
Get real about “vintage.” Fashion may be cyclical, but will that crushed velvet halter or that pair of stonewashed jeans ever be resurrected? We’ve all found ourselves holding on to certain pieces because we’re convinced they’ll come back in style, but even if they do, that’s likely to be a long time from now. So save that precious closet space for the things that matter today.
Tag! You’re it. Confession time: how many pieces in your closet still have the tags on them? If you’re guilty of repeatedly buying items that you never end up wearing, it’s time for some closet rehab. Too often, people let these pieces languish in their closet, but the smart move is to return it and get your money back. Otherwise, it’s just taking up space in both your closet and your bank account!
Sell, sell, sell. One person’s trash is another’s treasure—and that applies to clothes, too. Make money off those designer duds you no longer wear by cashing them in at a local consignment store, on Ebay, or on websites like Twice and Thred Up.

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